Announcements & News

March 10, 2016

Forensic Science Center again achieves national accreditation of its forensic DNA testing laboratories

ANAB Accreditation logo

The Marshall University Forensic Science Center’s accreditation of its forensic DNA laboratories has been renewed for four years.

The Forensic Science Center’s DNA laboratory has once again demonstrated technical competence through ANAB (formerly ANSI-ASQ National Accreditation Board/FQS) meeting the ISO/IEC 17025:2005 as well as the FBI’s Quality Assurance Standards for Forensic Testing and for DNA Databasing. The Forensic Science Center has been accredited since 2001 and ISO/IEC 17025:2005 compliant since 2003.

The scope of accreditation includes biological evidence screening, DNA analysis for forensic casework, CODIS (Combined DNA Index System) database testing and relationship/paternity testing.

Dr. Terry W. Fenger, director of Marshall’s Forensic Science Center, said West Virginia is fortunate to have two accredited forensic DNA testing laboratories that conform with ISO 17025:2005 standards as well as the FBI’s Quality Assurance Standards for Forensic Testing and for DNA Databasing.

“Marshall’s Forensic Science Center can be used as a resource to help with the state’s backlog reduction,” Fenger said.

Assessors from ANAB conducted an on-site reaccreditation assessment to evaluate the management system as well as the competence and conformance of the Marshall University Forensic Science Center’s DNA laboratory in November 2015.

Laboratory accreditation provides a benchmark for laboratory competence for specific types of testing, measurement and calibration. It assures customers that test data supplied by the laboratory are accurate and reliable. Laboratories are evaluated periodically to ensure continued compliance with requirements and maintenance of operations standards.

The Marshall University Forensic Science Center’s forensic DNA laboratories conduct DNA databasing on convicted offenders for the West Virginia State Police Forensic Laboratory. DNA profiles of convicted offenders become part of a state and national searchable database.



  • Mary Thomasson
  • Public Information Officer

  • Marshall University
    Forensic Science Center
  • 1401 Forensic Science Drive
  • Huntington, WV 25701